There are two routes to go as a virtual assistant — you can either work under a company for a set rate of pay, or work for yourself and set your own rates. Obviously the latter route is going to be the most lucrative in the long-run, but as it is with any business, it can take a while to grow a base of steady clients. If you're working under a company, there is no guarantee you'll get to answer emails as part of your work. You'll be asked to do whatever tasks the company needs in order for their clients to be taken care of. You can let the company know emails are part of your skillset, but again — no guarantees.

Also called “email processing,” these get-paid-to-send-emails jobs sound like an easy way to make cash — but unfortunately, basically all of them are scams. Typically, users must pay a fee (usually $25 – $150) to create an account. These companies then either ask you to pay more money to access additional services, or the work is nothing like it is described before signup. Many “email processing” jobs are pyramid schemes, meaning that you will have to convince other people to sign up and pay the registration fee in order for you to get paid. Now, they are on the bottom of the pyramid and you have moved up.


I like the ideas but I feel like some of them, mainly the ones you can do online, aren’t safe. I’m so afraid that it’ll end being a scam from all the stories I’ve heard from friends and family… I’ve tried going to plato’s closet to sell my clothes but refused to take any of it. said my clothes looked too “old” like I was too old to sell my clothes there so they sent me somewhere else for women, I am only 24 by the way…. but they said my clothes looked too young for the store. i’ve tried several other places and nobody will take my clothes, they all say the same thing. I’ve thought sites like Vinted or other sites you can sell used clothes but again, the safety issue. how do you know if its a scam or not? Also, other ways to sell your artwork that isn’t online?
Eimimo is the site I was happily to introduce to my followers as it promised to offer a lucrative $10 upon registration, and every time you refer a new member, you get paid 25 cents according to its site statement. I have referred hundreds of members to this site and I was happy about that. The only drawback of this site is the requirement to read $5 worth of emails yourself before you can ask for any payment, and it took me one and half year to read enough emails to accummulate $4.
Disagree with the photography idea. It may seem easy but there are those of us who have spent, in my case 10 + years learning the light, the technical aspects, the right way to pose… we have to keep pushing our prices higher because there are more people starting to eat away at the client base by undercutting…. and we’re trying to make money and feed families too. It only hurts an industry to undercut. Sorry. Good list otherwise, don’t do it as an expense to others.
No matter which email service you use, you have the experience or not, you don’t need any special skills to make money through email reading job. It is one of the easiest jobs by which you can easily make around $100-250 per month without much effort. There are various websites available where you can make extra money, however, you need to be extra careful as there are many scam websites as well. So here, we will explain you about some of the genuine websites that you may refer to earn money online by reading emails.
According to the FAQ of the net.legends Usenet news group, Dave Rhodes was a student at Columbia Union College (now Washington Adventist University), a Seventh-day Adventist college in Maryland, who wrote the letter and uploaded it as a text file to a nearby BBS around 1987.[2] The earliest posting to Usenet was posted by a David Walton in 1989, also using a Columbia Union College account. Walton referred to himself as, "BIZMAN DAVE THE MODEM SLAVE", and referred to "Dave Rhodes" in his post.[3] The true identity of Dave Rhodes has not been found. A supposed self-published web site by Dave Rhodes was found to be fake.[4][5]
“ There's at least one problem with chain letters. They're illegal if they request money or other items of value and promise a substantial return to the participants. Chain letters are a form of gambling, and sending them through the mail (or delivering them in person or by computer, but mailing money to participate) violates Title 18, United States Code, Section 1302, the Postal Lottery Statute (Chain letters that ask for items of minor value, like picture postcards or recipes, may be mailed, since such items are not things of value within the meaning of the law). ”

Joined OpinionOutpost I answer surveys and win prizes. This most trusted voice in the survey industry also gives out $10,000 every month to its participants. Two lucky winners get $1,000 each, rest of the prize money is distributed among other active members. your name may never come up, but by just being part of the Neilson world, which shapes tomorrow’s industries, is a great sense of accomplishment.


I feel sorry to those who register with eimimo for making some income from home. I registered with this site one and half year ago. I found out its lucrative upfront rewards. Although it also require that you have to finish reading enough emails to earn $5 before you can cash out any payment, I didn’t realize that it took me all these months to only accumulate over $4 of reading emails. But considering the part that it allows you to refer others to this site and get paid, it more like a small passive income for me. So I was hopefully thinking that I am going to get paid very soon after I read one more dollars of email. But this site choose to suspend my account with no explanation and no notice at all. What’s more, it leaves no way for you to contact them for any reason.
I am a little late posting this, busy due to the holiday season. I love finding ways to make extra money. I have been using ebay for about a year, and sometimes make as much as I do at my job. My regular job is doing things for people that they cannot or don’t want to do for themselves. I am a personal assistant, house sit for people who own beach houses, clean out and organize closets and entire houses. The bonus to organizing closets is that they don’t want what they clean out, so I can sell it on ebay too 🙂
I think what you’re asking is how you can make extra money to pay your real estate taxes. If that’s the case, it depends on your current financial situation, the amount of your estate taxes, your skills, and more. If you visit the “Make Money” section of our website, we have a few articles with different ideas that may be helpful for your situation: https://www.dollarsprout.com/category/make-money/
While you are waiting for someone to respond, head to your closet and see what clothes you no longer wear. Take these clothes to a store like Plato’s Closet, where they will sort through items and give you cash on the spot. Remember, many secondhand stores also take shoes, purses, and jewelry. When you bring your items, make sure they are clean and organized. If you go to Plato’s closet and dump out wrinkly clothes on the counter, they will not be impressed. If you go in there with ironed clothes that are all sitting neatly on hangers, you will have a much better chance of selling them.
It’s also a good time to take advantage of the gig economy. Can you play an instrument, repair clocks, tutor someone in math, plan a party, paint signs, repair decks, or write calligraphy? Think far and wide about what you’re good at, and write an ad for yourself. Chances are, someone out there needs your expertise, no matter how small or inconsequential you consider your talents to be.
Become a babysitter if you are good with children. There are websites that will connect you with people who need a babysitter. To get hired by people who do not know you, it will help to pass a CPR class, or to have a special talent or expertise for entertaining children. However, you might be able to make money more quickly just by babysitting for people you know, or by having friends refer you to others who need a babysitter.[14]
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